photo of yellow green red and brown plastic pieces on surface that shows they are connected through a web

Cultivating Care

For the benefit of three years down the line, when the pace of London life will likely resume to ‘business as normal’, I’m writing this post as daily routines are disrupted, relations protracted, and thoughts linger a little while longer. Like many others who are reflecting on the social impact of the corona virus pandemic, the past few weeks have made me acutely aware of how care practices are being enacted right now; what this means for how care can be cultivated, and what I choose to leave behind.

In my PhD research, one of the most unanticipated insights was observing the ways that children with severe speech and physical impairments enacted care practices with others. Care was a key value, evident both through children’s forms of engagement and through the subject matter of what they communicated.

For instance, when children in my study spent time out of school or in hospital for extended periods, a networked arrangement of people, technologies, artefacts and processes all allowed for care to be enacted as an ongoing process. I watched as children repeatedly asked after their friends and made cards for them in their absence. ‘We miss you’ cards were physically created, electronically transported and digitally remade in new contexts. People, crafted materials and online platforms and processes all allowed for these co-created and ongoing practices to take place (see also Light & Akama, 2014 and Brown & Choi, 2018 for more discussion on designing for care).

Care was expressed through material objects, like decorating children’s belongings in their absence and making cards, but also by finding affinity in what children said they liked to do, by trading stories and creating common ground. Care was evidenced through closeness and touch; holding hands, leaning on each other, and perhaps most powerfully, being at another’s side.  

Fast forward to March 2020, I observe how similar arrangements are both cultivating and inhibiting care. Having spent the past two weeks largely by myself, my laptop and mobile phone have been a lifeline for care. Regular video and audio calls, messaging, exchanges of funny memes and videos, as well as daily YouTube yoga and mindfulness sessions, are all collaboratively practiced in one form or another. Added to this, in my working hours, regular video calls, emails, chat forums (and hopefully more social virtual coffee and lunch breaks) are all reinforcing networks of care in my daily routine, in the absence of closeness and touch.

What is less helpful, are those shared ‘beware’ threads and videos that are making their rounds. I appreciate that these are probably shared with all good intention, but they do nothing more than exacerbate panic and stress. No, I won’t keep my groceries outdoors for 5 days before bringing them in the house, nor will I use that 50% homemade Cypriot ‘zivania’ brandy I have in my cupboard to clean my worktops (I mean, seriously…).

Right now, I’m trying to turn down the volume of all that unnecessary chatter to learn from insights gained from children. Right now, I’m attending more to making care. Right now, I’m making in a physical sense and drawing on technology and networks to remake this in new and care-ful ways. I highly recommend it!

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2 thoughts on “Cultivating Care

  1. Brilliant.

    Although, I must confess, and sadly representing those among us all who hold the prize for the dumbest in the world—even I had not yet heard yet of “homemade Cypriot ‘zivania’ brandy”!

    I mean, seriously???

    Going back to take care of my girls and myself. I Thank you for a most inspiring post!

    1. I forgive you for not knowing about Zivania 😉 …not many people outside of Cyprus do!
      Stay well and thanks for reading.

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